What Makes A Sculpture Striking?

Screaming My Hand Sculpture

Screaming My Hand, Haroshi

 

Screaming My Hand, Haroshi

 

Screaming My Hand, Haroshi

 

This is a sculpture made by the artist, Haroshi. He uses pieces from skate boards in order to create these types of sculptures. Unlike the other chosen pieces, this is three-dimensional. It encompasses several colors and a very realistic object that most viewers can identify with. 

This sculpture is a hand that appears to be reaching out for something. It includes very important details that make it as realistic as possible. There are fingernails and lines that one would find on a human hand. In the back of the hand, the veins signify that it is reaching for something. This is a very interesting piece because it gives personification to an inanimate object. It turns the art from pieces of wood to a colorful, lifesize hand. Instead of making it look like human skin, Haroshi chose to give a playful vibe to the sculpture by giving it colorful stripes. This could be a message of not taking life too seriously, even a protest to racism and skin color not really being important, or he could have just wanted to give color to the hand because he liked it. In the arm, there are chopped pieces that prevent the arm from being a full arm. This can also be interpreted in many different ways. These ideas are what make the piece so visually rhetorical and so bold. It tells a multitude of stories without any words at all.  The meaning is as multi-dimensional as the piece. It can mean whatever one wants it to mean. This is better understood by “visual rhetoric may not be used to persuade audiences in directions in-tended by a rhetor and may not be contributing to standard definitions of rational public communication, but its effects are significant and certainly not always negative. The world produced by visual rhetoric is not always—or even often—clear, well organized, or rational, but is, instead, a world made up of human experiences that are messy, emotional, fragmented, silly, serious, and disorganized” (Foss 310). It is important that art is not to be taken so seriously. There is no limit for what one art piece should mean. Ones interpretation of an image can be so significant and positive, or insignificant and negative. It can be striking or boring, There are no rules. That is what makes the idea of art so unique from anything else in the world.